Honor Our Soldiers

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On this Memorial Day, I want to take a moment to recognize the sacrifices that our military makes each day. I have been fortunate enough to never lose a loved one to the realities of war, but, as a military brat, I understand the hardships that come with being involved in the military. My grandfathers, uncles, cousins, and father all served in the military or still are in the military. My grandfather almost lost his life in the Korean War, while I remember many months as a kid when my dad was away serving in the Army. I understand that being in the military means sacrificing precious time that could be spent with loved ones. I understand the meaning of Memorial Day.

No matter what age, rank, or gender a fallen soldier is still a soldier who have their life to serve their country. They deserve every citizen’s respect, but, mostly, they deserve for their death to not have been in vain. If a person is going to sacrifice their life to serve their nation, then it is up to us to ensure that this country is worth dying for. Each day is an opportunity to improve yourself and your surroundings. Don’t destroy our nation with violence, greed, selfish ideals, and ignorance. Instead, do what you can to build this country up. As citizens, it is our duty to help protect the nation’s integrity, lifespan, and value, so that our soldiers are not falling for a dead cause. I know nothing can bring those soldiers back and that lost time can never be replaced, but we should do what we can. We should reflect on what we’re doing to make sure that we’re doing our best as a whole and as a country.

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About Tatiana Figueroa Ramirez

Born in Puerto Rico and raised in the mainland United States, I graduated with a B.A. in English Literature from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and am a 2016 VONA Voices Alumna. I currently perform spoken-word in the greater Washington D.C. area and have previously performed in Philadelphia, Miami, and the Dominican Republic. Most recently, I have been published in Public Pool, Spillwords, and The Acentos Review, and Here Comes Everyone: East & West Issue.

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